“Taking off the edge” ? – Autism and medication

000paediatrician

First of all: I am not against medication to help dealing with severe and debilitating mental issues, like depression or bipolar disorder, but also anxiety, PTSD and other stress related illnesses. And these can all be comorbidities of autism. So can ADHD, which I believe is increasingly diagnosed in autistic children. Medication can show good results, temporarily or long-term with all of these conditions. But when this was basically the first and ONLY therapy my paediatrician proposed, on “diagnosis day”, I was just disappointed. There is no ‘autism pill’, right? I think his duty would have been to tell me how to start HELPING my son, what to change at home, at school, to adjust expectations and methods, to help my son thrive! Instead, I went home with the my son’s TRIPLE diagnosis of ASD & ADHD & ODD, a lot of questions…and a recommendation to buy fish oil.

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4 thoughts on ““Taking off the edge” ? – Autism and medication

  1. autisticook

    Especially the better management thing. Not “maybe these are some things that could help him feel better.” No, it’s all about making it easier for *others* to cope with us.

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    1. suburp Post author

      I really don’t like the expression ‘taking of the edge’ either…as you say, it’s aimed at making things easier for all around rather than first looking into changes for the person…
      and I like my kid a bit “edgy”, yo..!

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      1. autisticook

        I also completely understand how disappointing and frustrating it is when that’s everything the professionals have to offer. I mean. They all seem to know so little about autism, except the few doctors who specialise in it. And I keep thinking, “Physician, educate thyself.” Because as you say. It’s their duty to KNOW about these things before talking to the parents.

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        1. suburp Post author

          I have to read that post. It probably didn’t help that the doc in question was sort of specialised on ADHD. He did not do the quite extensive testing, interviewing and questioning of third parties for the diagnosis, the school psychologist did. We have later seen a specialist psy who turned out to be not right either because while she was specialised on autism, she wasn’t exactly specialised on children.. and offered little practical help..and even when you are a parent not running after your own idea of a ‘perfect’ child, you still want actual help for them. Which is why people get vulnerable for the promises of snake oil sales people, too..

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